Ellen Langer

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  • Mindfulness
  • 41 days ago

Mindfulness in the Wild

I just returned from an amazing South African safari. Being up close to the “big five” was a bit scary, which made it very exciting. The big five are the strongest not the biggest animals—lions, leopards, elephants, buffalos, and rhinoceros.

Elephants came to the lodge and aways to drink from a watering hole, about eight yards away. I tried to get even closer to take a photo and was quickly told to step back. As an American believing we’re safe in most situations, I had to be reminded that these animals were wild and potentially dangerous. By the time I saw the lions I was fully aware that they—not our ranger or tracker—were in charge.

I looked closely at all the animals but when I looked at the lioness’ eyes, it felt different from the other animals. She seemed fully present—remarkably so. When someone is present you can feel it; that’s the way it was with this animal.

Some of the big five are larger than the lion, some have horns that can be deadly, but none of them seemed as “there” as the lion. I wondered if that was in fact what made the lion king of the jungle. Mindfulness might trump speed, size, and even brute force.

If I can find photographs of these animals and show only the eyes to people kept blind about which animal they were viewing, I might be able to get some confirmation of this idea. Then I will figure out a way to show the eyes to other animals and study their reactions.

For the moment, however, these ideas help keep the safari experience alive for me.

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  • Mindfulness
  • 97 days ago

Who Are You?

When asked this question, most of us reply first with our gender and then with the roles we occupy. I might say I’m a woman, a psychologist, an artist, and then turn to my relationships—a spouse, a friend, and so on. The more roles we have the more buffers we have against stress if something in one role goes awry. If I get disappointed regarding the sale of a painting, I can reflect on the acceptance of one of my journal articles. This is the accepted understanding of identity.

Some of our roles loom very large for us—mother or spouse, for example—and that can be limiting. If we have to endure the death of a child or a spouse, it’s often hard to understand who we are now.

There is a very different response we could give to “Who are you?”, one that doesn’t depend on personal or professional roles at all. Who am I? I’m a person who cares about people; who enjoys a sense of humor; who values generosity and consciousness. When we define ourselves in this way, we’re less vulnerable to negative circumstances, able to grow, and less defined by labels than by our more meaningful personal characteristics.

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  • Appearances
  • 109 days ago

On Being Interview with Krista Tippett

My interview with Krista has been posted. You can also listen to the podcast at any time at:

Ellen Langer — Science of Mindlessness and Mindfulness

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  • Mindfulness
  • 219 days ago

5 Mindfulness Steps That Guarantee Increased Success And Vitality

“In my training as a family therapist years ago, I began to see clearly that the ways in which we view ourselves and the world around us, in fact, alters our lives and our experiences dramatically. As science has proved, “The observer affects the observed,” or put another way, what you believe, you will live.

I was intrigued, then, when I recently learned of the mindfulness research conducted by Dr. Ellen Langer, a renowned mindfulness expert, experimental social psychologist and Psychology Professor at Harvard University, and the author of the groundbreaking book Mindfulness. Dr. Langer is considered the “mother of mindfulness” and has been researching mindfulness for more than 35 years, producing an important body of work on the impact of mindfulness on expanding success, health and vitality.”

Read the rest of the interview in Forbes

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  • Mindfulness
  • 219 days ago

Mindfulness in the Age of Complexity

“For nearly four decades, Langer’s research on mindfulness has influenced thinking across a range of fields, from behavioral economics to positive psychology. It demonstrates that by paying attention to what’s going on around us, instead of operating on autopilot, we can reduce stress, unlock creativity, and boost performance. “Mindfulness is the essence of engagement,” Langer says. “And it’s energy-begetting, not energy-consuming.” It enables people to recognize and take advantage of opportunities when they arise and to avert risk. Furthermore, Langer says, “You like people better, and people like you better, because you’re less evaluative. You’re more charismatic.”

In this interview she discusses the link between mindfulness and innovation, what managers can do to become more mindful, why mindfulness makes one less judgmental about others, and more.”

Read the Interview in The Harvard Business Review